Amazon (NASDAQ:AMZN) -- Amazon is a great beginner-friendly stock for a few reasons. First of all, it is the clear leader in its fields. One of the largest retailers of any kind in the entire world, Amazon makes up nearly half of all U.S. e-commerce sales, and it is also the dominant provider of cloud services to businesses. The company is growing impressively and has several of the competitive advantages we like to see (network effect and cost advantages in particular).
In late 2014, legendary self-help and business guru Tony Robbins published a book called Money: Master The Game. In it he explains the strategies and ideas used by the very best investors in the world - hedge fund managers, asset allocators and billionaires - that he gleaned from them during four years of interviews and how their lessons should be applied by the rest of us.
Michael R. Lewis is a retired corporate executive and entrepreneur. During his 40+ year career, Lewis created and sold ten different companies ranging from oil exploration to healthcare software. He has also been a Registered Investment Adviser with the SEC, a Principal of one of the larger management consulting firms in the country, and a Senior Vice President of the largest not-for-profit health insurer in the United States. Mike's articles on personal investments, business management, and the economy are available on several online publications. He's a father and grandfather, who also writes non-fiction and biographical pieces about growing up in the plains of West Texas - including The Storm.

Beware of confirmation bias: With penny stocks, beware of confirmation bias: the tendency to interpret information in a way that that conforms to your preexisting beliefs. This is something that afflicts nearly every human being and most new investors (or rookie poker players). Seeing what you want to see (albeit usually subconsciously) can be incredibly costly.


Finally, the other factor: risk tolerance. The stock market goes up and down, and if you’re prone to panicking when it does the latter, you’re better off investing slightly more conservatively, with a lighter allocation to stocks. Not sure? We have a risk tolerance quiz — and more information about how to make this decision — in our article about what to invest in.
But this isn’t your typical market, and you can’t show up and pick your shares off a shelf the way you select produce at the grocery store. Individual traders are typically represented by brokers — these days, that’s often an online broker. You place your stock trades through the broker, which then deals with the exchange on your behalf. (Need a broker? See our analysis of the best stockbrokers for beginners.)
So scroll down for proven rules on how to make money in the stock market for both beginners and more experienced investors. And if you're tempted to buy new IPOs like Tradeweb (TW), Ping Identity (PING),  Uber Technologies (UBER), Zoom Video Communications (ZM), and Warren Buffett-backed IPO StoneCo (STNE), first learn. These stocks provide important lesson on how to buy IPO stocks from Facebook (FB), Alibaba (BABA) and Snap (SNAP) first.
Stock investing is filled with intricate strategies and approaches, yet some of the most successful investors have done little more than stick with the basics. That generally means using funds for the bulk of your portfolio — Warren Buffett has famously said a low-cost S&P 500 index fund is the best investment most Americans can make — and choosing individual stocks only if you believe in the company’s potential for long-term growth.
Risk tolerance is a psychological trait that is genetically based, but positively influenced by education, income, and wealth (as these increase, risk tolerance appears to increase slightly) and negatively by age (as one gets older, risk tolerance decreases). Your risk tolerance is how you feel about risk and the degree of anxiety you feel when risk is present. In psychological terms, risk tolerance is defined as “the extent to which a person chooses to risk experiencing a less favorable outcome in the pursuit of a more favorable outcome.” In other words, would you risk $100 to win $1,000? Or $1,000 to win $1,000? All humans vary in their risk tolerance, and there is no “right” balance.
The OTC Markets Group (POTCQX, OTCQB, OTC Pink): Formerly known as The Pink Sheets, these markets are considered very risky for penny stock investors. Since they have such a low standard to get started, and almost non-existent fees, just about any company can be publicly traded on them. By avoiding penny stocks trading on these markets, you can reduce the vast majority of downside risks of investing in low-priced shares.

After going through a bear market in Q4 of 2018, on Jan. 4, the market posted a follow-through day to launch a new market uptrend, driving solid gains over the next several months. The market then pulled back again May 2019 before again continuing higher. This is just one example of how these types of stock market cycles continually repeat. Learning how they work and how to handle them using proven rules is key to long-term success..
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