Dividend investing refers to portfolios containing stocks that consistently issue dividend payments year-in and year-out. These stocks produce a reliable passive income that can be especially helpful in retirement. Dividend reinvestment is a way to accelerate portfolio growth. Still, you can't judge a stock by its dividend price alone. Sometimes companies will increase dividends as a way to attract investors when the underlying company is in trouble. Dividends are taxable.
Cost advantages -- A business can have a few different types of cost advantages. For example, an efficient distribution network can make it cheaper for a company to get its product around the country. A well-known brand name can give a company the ability to charge more than rivals. Or a proprietary manufacturing process can make it cheaper to produce a product. Coca-Cola (NYSE:KO) is a great example. Not only does the company have a massive and efficient distribution network, it has one of the most recognizable and valuable brand names in the world.

Businesses you don't understand -- Here's a great rule of thumb that works for beginners and expert investors alike. If you can't clearly explain what a company does and how it makes money in a sentence or two, don't invest in it. There are literally thousands of publicly traded companies to choose from, and you should be able to find plenty of opportunities in easy-to-understand businesses.
The solution to both is investing in stock index funds and ETFs. While mutual funds might require a $1,000 minimum or more, index fund minimums tend to be lower (and ETFs are purchased for a share price that could be lower still). Two brokers, Fidelity and Charles Schwab, offer index funds with no minimum at all. Index funds also cure the diversification issue because they hold many different stocks within a single fund.
When it comes to investing for long-term growth and putting your money to work, it is immensely important to understand your goals and the investment philosophy you will adhere to. It can be easy to lose sight of your targets amidst the noise on social media or news outlets surrounding the latest and greatest investment trends, but if you define your goals and investment strategy, you can stay on track.
The solution to both is investing in stock index funds and ETFs. While mutual funds might require a $1,000 minimum or more, index fund minimums tend to be lower (and ETFs are purchased for a share price that could be lower still). Two brokers, Fidelity and Charles Schwab, offer index funds with no minimum at all. Index funds also cure the diversification issue because they hold many different stocks within a single fund.

Even when the stock price has performed as expected, there are questions: Should I take a profit now before the price falls? Should I keep my position since the price is likely to go higher? Thoughts like these will flood your mind, especially if you constantly watch the price of a security, eventually building to a point that you will take action. Since emotions are the primary driver of your action, it will probably be wrong.

You can have the best strategy in the world, but if you can’t stay disciplined and keep your emotions in check, you risk losing profit. The first thing to note is that it’s human nature to show and react with emotion, especially when there’s money on the line. Fear, greed, and ambition are three of the most prevalent and potentially dangerous emotions. Fortunately, we have listed the top psychology tips to help you keep a level head.


Astute readers will realise that the above guidance is mainly taking different angles to help prepare for and guide decision making by the investor. The ability to confidently make decisions is vital for investment profits and long-term success. This pdf about the decision making models of Charlie Munger (business partner to Warren Buffett at Berkshire Hathaway - both are certified investment immortals) is almost certain to prove helpful.
It can be helpful to start with paper trading, or simulated trading that allows you to practice without risking actual money. By keeping track of pretend money, and making imaginary trades, you'll learn what tactics work and what sorts of penny stocks provide you with the greatest profits. If you lose on your trades, you don't lose cash in real life, and ideally, you'll learn some things that you might be doing wrong.

In that case, it is possible to invest passively in capital markets. This means that a private investor puts aside either a lump sum or an amount each month and the money is invested into a fund. That fund contains the savings of lots of other private investors and is managed by a professional equities investor. The fund will then be invested in an equity market (such as the NYSE) or a sector (such as energy).


In addition to knowledge of basic trading procedures, day traders need to keep up on the latest stock market news and events that affect stocks—the Fed's interest rate plans, the economic outlook, etc. So do your homework. Make a wish list of stocks you'd like to trade and keep yourself informed about the selected companies and general markets. Scan business news and visit reliable financial websites. 
Why I’m buying: Spell out what you find attractive about the company and the opportunity you see for the future. What are your expectations? What metrics matter most and what milestones will you use to judge the company’s progress? Catalog the potential pitfalls and mark which ones would be game-changers and which would be signs of a temporary setback.
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