Even when the stock price has performed as expected, there are questions: Should I take a profit now before the price falls? Should I keep my position since the price is likely to go higher? Thoughts like these will flood your mind, especially if you constantly watch the price of a security, eventually building to a point that you will take action. Since emotions are the primary driver of your action, it will probably be wrong.
Finding the best stocks to buy and watch starts with knowing what a big market winner looks like before it takes off. As noted above, IBD's study of the top-performing stocks in each market cycle since the 1880s has identified the seven telltale traits of market winners. Your goal is to find stocks that are displaying those same traits right now. Traits like explosive earnings and sales growth, a strong return on equity, a fast-growing and industry-leading product or service and strong demand among mutual fund managers.

The free intraday trading tips on this page can be used by both beginners and more advanced traders. When reading any tips, consider your circumstances. Day trading tips from Canada may not be applicable in Australia’s markets and vice versa. Plus, remember the switched on traders won’t just consider the day to day trading tips, they’ll also consider long-term trading psychology and risk management, because they know consistent profits come only to those who take a longer-term outlook, despite being a short-term trader.
We hope that this beginner stock market investing guide sets you on a good path towards further research and learning, investment success and profits. It really is possible to be a successful investor if you want to be, but it will take time, effort, dedication and patience. If you can find those within yourself and treat investing as a journey that will take years, you can do it too.
How much money do I need to start investing in stocks? The amount of money you need to buy an individual stock depends on how expensive the shares are. (Share prices can range from just a few dollars to a few thousand dollars.) If you want mutual funds and have a small budget, an exchange-traded fund (ETF) may be your best bet. Mutual funds often have minimums of $1,000 or more, but ETFs trade like a stock, which means you purchase them for a share price — in some cases, less than $100).

You can have the best strategy in the world, but if you can’t stay disciplined and keep your emotions in check, you risk losing profit. The first thing to note is that it’s human nature to show and react with emotion, especially when there’s money on the line. Fear, greed, and ambition are three of the most prevalent and potentially dangerous emotions. Fortunately, we have listed the top psychology tips to help you keep a level head.
Beware of confirmation bias: With penny stocks, beware of confirmation bias: the tendency to interpret information in a way that that conforms to your preexisting beliefs. This is something that afflicts nearly every human being and most new investors (or rookie poker players). Seeing what you want to see (albeit usually subconsciously) can be incredibly costly.

Bernard Baruch, known as “The Lone Wolf of Wall Street,” owned his own seat on the New York Stock Exchange by age 30 and became of the country’s best known financiers by 1910. Mr. Baruch, while a master of his profession, had no illusions about the difficulties of successful stock market investing, saying, “The main purpose of the stock market is to make fools of as many men as possible.” According to Ken Little, author of 15 books on investing and personal finance topics, “If you are an individual investor in the stock market, you should know that the system stacks the deck in its favor.”
Diversify your portfolio to make sure that you don’t have too much exposure to one sector. This will help lessen your risks. Make sure to ease into your positions. You don’t need to invest all your money at once, and by easing in, you cost-average your position. Understand that investing in the market is a long-term strategy and historically, with time, the market goes up.

Dividend growth -- This is the most optional characteristic on the list, as there are some great beginner-friendly stocks that don't pay dividends. Berkshire Hathaway (NYSE:BRK.A) (NYSE:BRK.B) is a great example. However, if a stock does pay a dividend, an established track record of dividend growth is an excellent characteristic for long-term-focused beginning investors to look for.

To be perfectly clear, knowing how to identify great businesses is more important than being able to identify cheap stocks for beginners. A great business will typically be a good long-term performer, even if you buy in at a bit of an expensive valuation. On the other hand, a bad business that you invest in at a cheap valuation will seldom work out well.

Once you've decided that you want to buy stocks, the next step is to open a brokerage account, fund the account, and buy the shares. After you've done that, it's important to keep a long-term mentality -- if your stocks go down, for example, it can be very tempting to panic and sell. Remember how carefully you chose your stocks, and avoid selling your stocks without fully exploring the company's situation.


Day trading is the act of buying and selling a financial instrument within the same day or even multiple times over the course of a day. Taking advantage of small price moves can be a lucrative game—if it is played correctly. But it can be a dangerous game for newbies or anyone who doesn't adhere to a well-thought-out strategy. What's more, not all brokers are suited for the high volume of trades made by day traders. Some brokers, however, are designed with the day trader in mind. You can check out our list of the best brokers for day trading to see which brokers best accommodate those who would like to day trade.
A $50 stock can be more expensive than an $800 stock because the share price means nothing on its own. The relationship of price-to-earnings and net assets is what determines if a stock is over- or under-valued. Companies can keep prices artificially high by never conducting a stock split, yet without having the underlying foundational support. Make no assumptions based on price alone.
Imagine owning stocks in five different companies, each of which you expect to continually grow profits. Unfortunately, circumstances change. At the end of the year, you might have two companies (A & B) that have performed well so their stocks are up 25% each. The stock of two other companies (C & D) in a different industry are up 10% each, while the fifth company’s (E) assets were liquidated to pay off a massive lawsuit.
While that may sound like outdated advice, in late 2012, an American marketing executive explained how he had turned $20,000 into $2 million during the recession. Chris Camillo explained that Wall Street is quite homogenous and tends to be behind the curve on trends involving females, young people and those on low incomes. Camillo invested in stocks that anyone could have, he just spotted trends before the investment bankers did and was able to make some very sizable profits.
Dollar-cost average: This sounds complicated, but it’s not. Dollar-cost averaging means investing a set amount of money at regular intervals, such as once per week or month. That set amount buys more shares when the stock price goes down and fewer shares when it rises, but overall, it evens out the average price you pay. Some online brokerage firms let investors set up an automated investing schedule.
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